OPERATION DISCOVERY

The International Bomber Command Centre is appealing for local historical groups and societies throughout Great Britain to help record biographical information on the 40,000 British airmen and women lost to Bomber Command during WW2 as well as the pre-war and post-war periods of Bomber Command’s existence. This information will be added to our online Losses Database which already has more than 4 million pieces of information on the short lives of these brave souls.

To give the project a local flavour, we will send details of the airmen and women lost in your local area to work on. We’d like to know as much as possible about their lives before enlistment, including their home life, schooling, careers before enlistment as well as sports, hobbies and interests, plus any other interesting information you may find.

Online videos will be made available to give details of exactly what we are looking for and how to submit the information you find.

By adding this biographical information to the service information we already hold, you will be helping to create the most comprehensive record of their lives in anywhere in the world, for the benefit of current and future generations.

If you think you can help, please get in touch by emailing losses@internationalbcc.co.uk.

Thank you!

Dave Gilbert

Losses Archivist

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